Links for Keyword: Tourettes

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Doctors in the US have carried out brain surgery on a 31-year-old man in a bid to cure him of Tourette syndrome. Jeff Matovic from Ohio has had the disorder, which is characterised by uncontrollable vocalisations and movement, since he was six. Doctors used a technique called deep brain stimulation, which involves placing tiny electrodes inside the brain to regulate electrical activity. They say his symptoms have all but disappeared since the operation. "We were genuinely amazed at the patient's response," said Dr Robert Maciunas, who carried out the surgery. Deep brain stimulation has been used on patients with Parkinson's disease, to help reduce the shaking associated with the condition. The electrodes are placed deep inside the brain beside the thalamus, which controls movement. (C)BBC

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 16: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavior Disorders
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 12: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavioral Disorders
Link ID: 5232 - Posted: 04.02.2004

One out of four students in special-education classes has a tic-related disorder like Tourette syndrome, and the rate of Tourette's among students in the general population is 50 to 75 times higher than has been traditionally thought by doctors, according to a study published in the Oct. 23 issue of the journal Neurology. The neurologists who did the study say that Tourette's comes in many forms, including variations much milder than the profanity-spewing, limb-jerking characters seen on TV shows like Ally McBeal and LA Law. Doctors say the findings should raise awareness among teachers and doctors that children who are performing poorly in school and who have tics may need medical treatment, and that such treatment could ease school difficulties for these students. "Most people view Tourette's as a very rare, unusual disorder with bizarre symptoms, but it's really very common, usually with mild symptoms," says Roger Kurlan, M.D., a professor of neurology at the University of Rochester Medical Center and lead author of the Neurology paper. ©Copyright University of Rochester Medical Center, 1999-2001.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 16: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavior Disorders
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 12: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavioral Disorders
Link ID: 913 - Posted: 11.03.2001

TAMPA, Fla (Sept. 17, 2001) -- A nicotine patch boosts the effectiveness of drugs administered to relieve the involuntary movements and other symptoms of Tourette's syndrome -- even when the drug dosage is cut in half, a University of South Florida College of Medicine study found. The double-blind, placebo-controlled study, published in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Tourette's Syndrome Association of America. It demonstrated that a low-dose nicotine patch may be useful, particulary in alleviating the motor tics of children with Tourette's syndrome.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 16: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavior Disorders
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 12: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavioral Disorders
Link ID: 622 - Posted: 10.20.2001

tourette drug has unexpected effect A new study by Johns Hopkins Children's Center neurologists suggests that baclofen, a drug long thought to be effective in reducing the vocal and motor tics associated with Tourette syndrome, improves a patient's overall sense of well-being but does not significantly reduce tics. "One of our conclusions is that baclofen helps as a treatment for Tourette syndrome, but it appears to improve something other than tics," says pediatric neurologist Harvey Singer, M.D., the report's lead author. "We originally thought baclofen would diminish patients' vocal and muscular tics but found, instead, that it's more useful in making patients feel less impaired by their tics."

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 16: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavior Disorders
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 12: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavioral Disorders
Link ID: 291 - Posted: 10.20.2001

What Makes Tics Tick? Clues Found In Tourette Twins' Caudates For the first time, scientists have a neurobiological explanation for the variation in severity of tics in Tourette Syndrome. Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have traced such symptom differences to "supersensitivity" of certain neurotransmitter receptors in the brain structure responsible for carrying out automatic behaviors. They suggest that this dysfunction may underlie the compulsion to act out the sudden movements and vocalizations that characterize Tourette Syndrome, which affects about 100,000 Americans with its full-blown form and up to 0.5% of the population with milder symptoms. The researchers report on their findings in the August 30th issue of Science. In a brain imaging study of identical twins differently affected by the disorder, Daniel Weinberger, M.D., Steven Wolf, M.D., and colleagues in the NIMH Clinical Brain Disorders Branch found that binding to D2 dopamine receptors in the caudate nucleus was higher in the sibling with the more severe symptoms.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 16: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavior Disorders
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 12: Psychopathology: Biological Basis of Behavioral Disorders
Link ID: 290 - Posted: 10.20.2001