Links for Keyword: Animal Rights

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By Jane Salodof MacNeil Physically and behaviorally, few creatures have been measured, tested, and probed as much as the laboratory mouse. Yet what do scientists know about making mice happy or free of pain? Often, the answer is not nearly enough. This is a knowledge vacuum with ethical and experimental ramifications. Pain management and environmental enrichment are hot topics in laboratory animal science. They are also conundrums defying easy fixes. Researchers may want to mitigate pain and suffering in their charges, but animals of prey hide their pain. Moreover, researchers do not agree on which medicines to administer, or at what doses. Making the animals' living conditions more stimulating is also problematic. Doing what comes naturally, some social animals turn their new communal housing into boxing rings. And even if they don't, the new environment can change animal physiology in ways that confound experiments and undermine comparisons to previously obtained data. © 2004, The Scientist LLC, All rights reserved.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 5346 - Posted: 06.24.2010

People linked to animal experimentation who have suffered attacks and intimidation from animal rights extremists have banded together to lobby the UK government for changes in the law. The Victims of Animal Rights Extremism (VARE) group was launched at the British Parliament on Thursday. The 100-strong body of people who have suffered violence and harassment wants the government to crack down on the problem of extremism. "I think there's a tremendous and desperate need for an organisation like this to exist," says Mark Matfield, director of the Research Defence Society, who set up VARE. The voluntary group, which is currently not listed as a charity so that its address does not have to be revealed, aims to also provide support and help for victims of extremism. "The government and police don't seem to be solving this problem," says Matfield. He adds the situation may even be worsening. © Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 5337 - Posted: 06.24.2010

Robin McKie and Mark Townsend Sweeping new powers against animal rights activists are being prepared by Home Secretary David Blunkett. New legislation would make it an imprisonable offence to intimidate scientists involved in animal research, and prevent large groups gathering outside laboratories. A national police unit dedicated to tackling animal terrorism could be set up. The decision follows last week's announcement that Cambridge University has abandoned construction of its proposed Primate Research Centre. The laboratory, where scientists would have carried out research on Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and other brain diseases, was ditched because the costs of protecting buildings and staff from activists protesting about the use of primates in experiments had begun to spiral out of control. The laboratory's price tag had already risen from 24 million to 32 million and was expected to increase even more as security estimates soared. Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2004

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4901 - Posted: 06.24.2010

NewScientist.com news service Cambridge University has axed plans for a controversial primate centre to conduct animal research into brain diseases. However, the centre could still be built elsewhere, possibly at a location more protected from action by anti-vivisectionists. The UK Prime Minister Tony Blair had backed the plan as being "of national importance". The university blames "escalating costs" caused by years of delays and security concerns for its decision to axe the centre. But it is being accused by many of having buckled under a sustained campaign from animal-rights activists who opposed the centre from the outset. © Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4875 - Posted: 06.24.2010

The present situation where scientists are caught between political manipulation and public incomprehension must end for all our good Colin Blakemore Not a squeak. No sign of communication. Sitting in a strange environment, remote, mysterious and invisible. Microscope and mass spectrometer at the ready; ultraviolet sensor, thermocouples and three-axis accelerometer poised for action. Thirty-two-bit processor eager to crunch numbers. Centuries of scientific knowledge, years of preparation and investment were needed for its work. Yet it remains silent, a source of fascination to the public but unheard. No, not Beagle-2 (although as I write it is, alas, still silent). This image is the stereotypical, faceless British scientist - a grey, male personage in a white coat. He works long hours and shows a vocational devotion rare in other professions. His primary targets are gaining tenure in his job, publishing before his rivals in the States and getting his next grant. Telling anyone about his ideas (except through the medium of an academic paper) is very low on his list of priorities. In the pub, he will talk politics or Manchester Utd rather than bosons or genes. Who would listen, who would bother, who would understand? Was it ever thus? Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4782 - Posted: 06.24.2010

NewScientist.com news service Cambridge University has been granted permission to build a controversial new laboratory for conducting neuroscience research on primates. The centre is aimed at studying conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and stroke. The go-ahead, issued on Friday by John Prescott, the UK's deputy prime minister, was greeted with delight by scientists and doctors, but with anger by anti-vivisectionists. The proposed lab was the subject of a bitter public enquiry. Scientists argued that vital medical research cannot be done in any other way than by experiments on the brains of monkeys. Opponents disagreed, saying the work is unethical and that research on primates actually hinders rather than helps research into neurological disease (see New Scientist print edition, 23 November 2002). © Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4583 - Posted: 06.24.2010

By DAVID CRARY, AP National Writer NEW YORK -- A whistleblowing veterinarian has entangled Columbia University's prestigious medical center in a protracted dispute after alleging that baboons and other lab animals suffered from cruel or negligent treatment. A year after veterinarian Catherine Dell'Orto complained to senior medical center officials, the case remains very much alive. It is the subject of investigations by two federal agencies, and animal-rights activists are seeking punitive action against the medical center. Dell'Orto has left the university, contending she was shunned after speaking up, but she continues to press her cause. Copyright © 2003, The Associated Press

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4372 - Posted: 06.24.2010

Susan Milius The extent of a species' home range can be used to forecast how well members of the species will adapt to captivity, according to a controversial new survey of troubled behavior in zoo animals. "As far as I know, we're the first to test species vulnerability to welfare problems in captivity," says Ros Clubb of the University of Oxford in England. She spent 3 years examining carnivore-behavior studies from about 40 zoos. Animals with the biggest ranges, such as polar bears, tended to have the highest infant mortality and do a lot of repetitive pacing, report Clubb and her coauthor Georgia Mason. The results highlight a nasty problem for conservationists, says Clubb. Animals that need a lot of land often prove the hardest to conserve in the wild, yet her results show they could also be the most vulnerable in captivity. Copyright ©2003 Science Service.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook; Chapter 6: Evolution of the Brain and Behavior
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4334 - Posted: 06.24.2010

NewScientist.com news service Carnivores with large home ranges have worse reactions to being caged than those that roam less widely in the wild, according to a major study of zoo animal welfare. The researchers conclude that wide-ranging carnivores should not be kept in captivity. "If we can't keep them well then don't keep them at all," says Ros Clubb at Oxford University, UK, who compiled the research. Scientists have suggested before that range size is important, but the new work is the first to show this with comprehensive data. © Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4321 - Posted: 06.24.2010

Stacy Finz, Chronicle Staff Writer The two pipe bomb explosions at an Emeryville biotechnology firm last week were part of a surge of extremism by animal rights and environmental militants that activists predict will increase as fringes of the movement grow more frustrated with peaceful protest. Though the threat may be nothing more than bravado, FBI agents are taking it seriously. "It is true that we've seen an increase in the intensity and level of damage," said Phil Celestini, a supervisory agent in the FBI's domestic terrorism unit in Washington. "And the Emeryville incident was certainly an escalation in their tactics." ©2003 San Francisco Chronicle

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4234 - Posted: 06.24.2010

SULTAN, Wash. - Days after 10,000 mink were released from a farm in southern Snohomish County, hundreds of the animals not yet captured have converged on local farms in search of food. The animals had killed at least 25 exotic birds and attacked other livestock in the area. "Over half our livestock was shredded. Murdered. Eaten alive," said Jeff Weaver, who discovered the dead birds on his farm Thursday. "These are not like regular farm animals. They're our pets." Copyright © 2003 The Associated Press. All rights Copyright © 2003 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 4186 - Posted: 06.24.2010

Housing animals in complex environments where they must use By Hal Cohen Researchers are bringing the wild inside their laboratories. Compelled by studies that suggest animals' bodies and minds react to even minor changes in living conditions, scientists are decorating animal cage interiors to mimic the exterior world of nature, thus challenging lab animals to think and move. A large, complex living space outfitted with objects that stimulate animals' mental and physical growth form the ideals of environmental enrichment (EE)--a field of study started by psychologists in the 1960s, which has now moved mainstream, particularly among neuroscientists. Advocates of EE say that providing multifaceted living conditions is essential to the mental and physical well-being of lab animals and could also influence the validity of experimental results. "You can argue whether your previous results are valid or not," says Vera Baumans, professor of laboratory animal science at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. "At KI we're going to find out if that is the case." Not all labs take enrichment as seriously as the Karolinska Institute, but the growing interest in the relationship between environment and experimental results has converged with the influence of animal rights' groups on science policy, so that labs are becoming more aware than ever of animal care. "Effects from differential experiences have been found in species from fly to philosopher," says Mark Rosenzweig, professor emeritus of graduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and pioneer of applying environmental enrichment to laboratory testing. "Many investigators have come to realize that animals raised without sufficient stimulation do not develop full growth of brain or full behavioral capacities." ©2003, The Scientist Inc.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 3775 - Posted: 06.24.2010

Elizabeth Fernandez, Chronicle Staff Writer A small monkey that escaped from a research lab at UC Davis two weeks ago is now believed to have died in the drain system, university officials said. "Her fate wasn't a pleasant one," said UC Davis spokeswoman Lisa Lapin on Wednesday. "It makes a lot of us sick, frankly. We want to take good care of our animals. A lot of the people at the primate center have been in tears." The 4-pound gray and tan rhesus monkey slipped from her cage during a cleaning at the California National Primate Research Center on Feb. 13. She had been spotted darting into a 4-inch drain. ©2003 San Francisco Chronicle

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 3489 - Posted: 06.24.2010

Opponents of proposed UC Davis facility go ape over security breach Elizabeth Fernandez, Chronicle Staff Writer The escape of a small gray and tan monkey from a UC Davis medical research center may threaten a proposed high-security lab on campus to study deadly infectious organisms such as anthrax and smallpox that could be used as terrorist weapons. The 4-pound rhesus macaque monkey vanished two weeks ago as her cage was being cleaned at the California National Primate Research Center, where she was used for breeding purposes and was "disease free," according to the university. But the primate's disappearance is raising grave concerns among the many opponents of a proposed $150 million biocontainment facility that would be entrusted to study the world's most dangerous diseases. ©2003 San Francisco Chronicle

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 3476 - Posted: 06.24.2010

NewScientist.com news service Limited details of the millions of animal experiments conducted in the UK each year are to be published in future, the government announced on Tuesday. The government was responding to the findings of a House of Lords select committee report concerning the use of animals in medical and scientific research. "The government agrees with the report's finding that animal experiments are necessary to develop human and veterinary medicine and to protect humans and the environment," said Home Office minister Bob Ainsworth. © Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 3334 - Posted: 06.24.2010

Four animal rights activists have been convicted of orchestrating a blackmail campaign against firms that supplied an animal testing research centre. They used paedophile smears, criminal damage and bomb hoaxes to intimidate companies associated with Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS) in Cambridgeshire. The four, members of Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC) from Hampshire and London, had denied the charges. A fifth defendant was cleared by the Winchester Crown Court jury. During a six-year campaign the group falsely claimed managers of the companies were paedophiles. They also sent hoax bombs parcels and made threatening telephone calls to firms telling them to cut links with HLS. One of the features of intimidation included sending used sanitary items in the post to the firms and daubing roads outside managers' homes with slogans such as "puppy killer". The court heard the defendants were part of SHAC, which was based near Hook, Hampshire, and targeted companies in the UK and Europe between 2001 and 2007. It was told Nicholson, from Eversley in Hampshire, was a founder member of SHAC, who managed the "menacing" campaigns against the firms. Selby, Wadham and Medd-Hall were released on conditional bail, while Nicholson was remanded in custody. A man who worked for a company which transported animals for HLS said he still fears reprisals after being sent obscene packages. We received a lot of phone calls and letters [which] contained things like used condoms, used sanitary towels, razor blades and syringe needles claiming to be from people who are infected with AIDS," he added. (C)BBC

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 12393 - Posted: 12.29.2008

Oxford University has resumed building work on its controversial new laboratory complex on South Parks Road. Construction work on the biomedical facility had been halted in July 2004 after a sustained campaign of protest from animal rights groups. The building contractor, Walter Lilly & Co, said its staff had been subjected to threats and intimidation. The university has now engaged a new company and work on the 20m complex began early on Wednesday. Oxford said it was determined to finish the project, which is now well behind schedule. "The new biomedical research building will provide world-class facilities reflecting the university's commitment to animal welfare and to scientific progress," added David Holmes, the institution's Registrar. "Completing the project will be good for animal welfare, good for medial research and good for the treatment of life-threatening conditions all over the world." Mr Holmes confirmed that the government had been supportive and that assistance had been given by Thames Valley Police. He added that the 20m construction cost did not include security costs for the site. The facility was first conceived a decade ago; it has been in detailed planning for over five years and phase one of the project was originally to have been completed this Autumn. (C)BBC

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 8243 - Posted: 12.01.2005

A major study will examine what limits should be put on the continued use of non-human primates in UK experiments. The review is being undertaken by four of Britain's leading medical and scientific organisations. It follows the fractious arguments between the research community and the animal welfare lobby over the need for new testing centres in the country. Some 3,000 primates - mostly marmoset and macaque monkeys - are used in British labs each year. Three-quarters of them are employed in toxicology tests - checking to see if new drug compounds are likely to be harmful if carried forward into human trials. Mainstream science has taken the view that monkeys' physiological similarities to humans - we are also primates - make them powerful tools to investigate the diseases and fundamental biology of people. But that closeness also raises an acute ethical dilemma - and there is growing pressure for the relatively small numbers of non-human primates used in tests to be reduced still further. Now, the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Royal Society, the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust are setting up a working group to examine the recent, current and future scientific basis for biological and medical research involving non-human primates. (C)BBC

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 7072 - Posted: 03.23.2005

By Julianna Kettlewell, BBC News science reporter Farm animals have feelings which should be respected and catered for, academics at a London, UK, meeting have said. They believe animals should not be dismissed as simple automatons - cows take pleasure in solving problems and sheep can form deep friendships. Delegates from around the globe were speaking at the Compassion in World Farming Trust (CIWF Trust) conference. They shared ways of exploring the minds of animals, as well as monitoring their suffering and alleviating their pain. "The study of animal sentience is one of the most exciting and important in the whole of biology," said Professor Marian Dawkins, of Oxford University. "My plea is that, when we make decisions and regulations about animals and campaign for them, the animals' voices should be heard and heard strongly." For whatever reasons, we humans tend to draw a charmed ring around ourselves - we suppose we are the only ones that think thoughts and feel feelings. We are happy to ascribe emotions to a tiny flailing inarticulate baby, while denying them in a sheep or even a chimpanzee. Talk of animal sentience is often brushed off as fluffy and sentimental - not the stuff of science or the real world. But perhaps we have been too hasty in our dismissal - perhaps consciousness does not peer through our eyes alone. "They are not unfeeling objects," said Professor Marc Bekoff, of the University of Colorado, US. "And what animals feel matters very much as they try to negotiate their lives in a human-dominated and often abusive world, in which they are mere pawns in our incessant and obsessive attempts to control their lives for our and not their benefit. (C)BBC

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 7055 - Posted: 03.20.2005

By Simon Cox and Richard Vadon The tactics of a small hardcore of animal rights activists have brought them in confrontation with major corporations, scientific establishments and the government. Some of their strategies have appalled many people, especially those who have been targeted. Whether people support them or not, it cannot be denied that their tactics have had an impact. So what have been the key elements of their approach? The campaign waged against Huntingdon Life Sciences, Europe's largest vivisection laboratory, has shown the increasingly sophisticated tactics of the animal rights movement. The Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (Shac) campaign has focused on the suppliers. So far this year 80 companies have severed ties with Huntingdon because of pressure from animal rights campaigners and fear of bad publicity. Greg Avery of the Shac campaign has found that many of the biggest companies can be persuaded very quickly and not because they care about animals. (C)BBC

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 1: Biological Psychology: Scope and Outlook
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 1: An Introduction to Brain and Behavior
Link ID: 6446 - Posted: 11.19.2004