Links for Keyword: Narcolepsy

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Emma Young, San Diego
The devastating sleep disorder narcolepsy could be the result of a sufferer's immune system attacking key cells in the brain, say US scientists. Jerry Siegel at the University of California, Los Angeles and his team gave commonly used immune system suppressants to dogs with a genetic mutation that makes them develop narcolepsy. They found that the onset of the disease was dramatically delayed. Furthermore, when symptoms did appear, they were also much less severe. "The immunosuppressants in dogs produced a reduction in symptoms that is quite remarkable," Siegel says. "It is quite likely that a similar treatment could be effective in humans if we could detect symptoms at an early stage." © Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 14: Biological Rhythms, Sleep, and Dreaming
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 10: Biological Rhythms and Sleep
Link ID: 1012 - Posted: 11.17.2001

Narcolepsy
The incurable sleep disorder, narcolepsy, has long mystified scientists. But recently, several discoveries culled from animal research indicate that molecular brain malfunctions may participate in the development of the ailment. The new insights are focusing the search for targeted human treatments for narcolepsy as well as other types of sleeping problems. Dramatically drowsy during calculus class? Maybe it's the monotone teacher, an overdose of David Letterman or, perhaps, narcolepsy. This brain disorder, which afflicts an estimated 200,000 Americans, is marked by an uncontrollable, overwhelming desire to sleep during the day. The attacks can occur at any time, even in the middle of a conversation about yesterday's homework.

Related chapters from BP7e: Chapter 14: Biological Rhythms, Sleep, and Dreaming
Related chapters from MM:Chapter 10: Biological Rhythms and Sleep
Link ID: 363 - Posted: 10.20.2001